Architecture / Building / Place

  • Anatolia: A vast plateau between the Black, Mediterranean, and Aegean Seas, synonymous with the peninsula of Asia Minor: today comprises most of Turkey.
  • bastide: In the Middle Ages, a town erected by fiat and according to a specified plan.
  • campidoglio: At Rome, the Capitol, or Capitoline Hill. The small open place at the top of the Capitoline Hill, between the northern crest where the citadel once stood and the southern crest where stood the Temple of Jupiter, is called Piazza del Campidoglio…
  • Canopus: Alexandrian town in Ancient Egypt, celebrated for its canals and beauty. 2. Canopic bulbous ovoid Ancient Egyptian jar, usually of stone, to contain the internal organs of the dead after disemboweling during the mummification process, with the lid shaped like a head
  • Catal Hüyük: A Neolithic settlement in Anatolia, dated 6500-5000 B.C. One of the world’s earliest cities, it had mud-brick fortifications and houses, frescoed shrines, a fully developed agriculture, and extensive trading in obsidian, the chief material for tool-making.
  • cecropium: A building or sacred spot at Athens, dedicated to or commemorative of Kekrops, the mythical founder of the city
  • Cnossus: See Knossos.
  • Elysium: Land of the dead in Classical Antiquity. 2. Place where a state of ideal or perfect happiness may be achieved…
  • Elyzium: Land of the dead in Classical Antiquity. 2. Place where a state of ideal or perfect happiness may be achieved…
  • Fertile Crescent: An agricultural region arching from the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea in the west to Iraq in the east: the location of humankind’s earliest cultures.
  • Herculaneum: Roman city, buried after the eruption of Vesuvius. Its rediscovery and excavation proved to be a potent catalyst in Neo-Classicism
  • Mecca: A city in Saudi Arabia, birthplace of Muhammad and spiritual center of Islam.
  • Mesopotamia: An ancient region in western Asia between the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, comprising the lands of Sumer and Akkad and occupied successively by the Sumerians, Babylonians, Assyrians, and Persians: now part of Iraq.
  • Mycenae: One of the most ancient Greek cities located in the southern part of Greece. Strategically located as a citadel, it was the center of Mycenaean civilization. The city was approached through the Lion Gate of massive masonry construction, surmounted by affronted lions. Other important ancient remains include the Treasury of Atreus and the beehive tombs.
  • place: A physical environment having particular characteristics or used for a particular purpose. 2. An open public space in a French town.
  • Pompeian: The Roman town of Pompeii was buried by deposits of volcanic ash when Mount Vesuvius erupted (AD 79), thus partially preserving it for posterity…
  • Rome: A city in the central part of Italy which, according to tradition, was founded by Romulus and Remus in 758 B.C: ancient capital of the Roman Empire and site of Vatican City, the seat of authority of the Roman Catholic Church.
  • Sumer: An ancient region in southern Mesopotamia, where a number of independent cities and city-states were established as early as 5000 B.C. A number of its cities, as Eridu, Uruk, and Ur, are major archeological sites.
  • Tajin: Site of the outstanding example of architecture of the Totonacs (ca. 200-900 A.D.), in the State of Vera Cruz, Mexico. They Pyramid of the Niches has six tiers which are deeply niched, in an adaptation of the tablero; a stair-way flanked by balusters rises on its eastern slope; characteristic of the El Tajin style of Mesoamerican architecture of the Totonacs.

Also see Architecture index.