Architecture / Building / Clock

  • automata: Water-, wind-, or clockwork-propelled mechanical devices rooted in ancient traditions – again in vogue during the Italian Renaissance – facilitating movement such as transporting large amounts of water to power garden-features (fountains/cascades), or driving outdoor curiosities incorporating motion, sound, music, and/or light
  • clochaharium: A building or tower in which clocks and bells were contained.
  • clochier: A building or tower in which clocks and bells were contained.
  • clock: A timepiece. Clocks have traditionally been attached to municipal buildings and buildings of community significance.
  • clock tower: A timepiece or clock mounted on a standalone tower or tower-like portion of a building.
  • clock turret: A small tower or turret bearing on one or more of its faces a clock; distinguished from a clock tower by its subordinate character with reference to the rest of the building, or by its smaller dimensions. It usually stands upon or rises out of the roof, and is consequently in most cases a framed structure
  • dial: An instrument for determining the hour of the day by means of the shadow cast on a graduated surface. In its simples form, the non-portable dial consists of an iron rod fixed in a wall, its shadow moving over a series of radiating lines painted or cut on the masonry below. 2. Any similar graduated surface, especially when circular; as the face of a clock or meter.
  • floral-clock: A 20th century feature of public parks and seaside resorts, with the face planed with low-growing flowers, etc., and the moving hands (controlled by an underground motor) also decorated with foliage
  • flower-clock: A 20th century feature of public parks and seaside resorts, with the face planed with low-growing flowers, etc., and the moving hands (controlled by an underground motor) also decorated with foliage
  • gnomen: That part of a sundial which casts the shadow upon the dial plate.
  • horologium: A clock. 2. A building to shelter a timepiece.
  • jacquemart: A figure, usually of metal, the arms of which move by clockwork at certain hours, and which, with a mallet or the like, strikes the hours, the quarters, etc., upon a bell. These figures are generally in pairs, one on each side of a bell, but this apparently for mere symmetry, or to make a somewhat more imposing group.
  • jaquemart: A figure, usually of metal, the arms of which move by clockwork at certain hours, and which, with a mallet or the like, strikes the hours, the quarters, etc., upon a bell. These figures are generally in pairs, one on each side of a bell, but this apparently for mere symmetry, or to make a somewhat more imposing group.

Also see Architecture index.